saintoswald:

I…..don’t think…..this is correct

saintoswald:

I…..don’t think…..this is correct

nixxie-fic:

RIP Lynda Bellingham OBE.

Some people might have known her as the OXO mum or from the TV show loose women, but she also had an amazing Doctor Who role as ‘The Inquisitor’ in ‘The Trial of a Timelord’ alongside Colin Baker.

She was diagnosed with colon cancer in July last year and had undergone chemotherapy, but the cancer spread to her lungs & liver. She decided to stop the treatment to save her family more suffering & so that she could ‘go out on a high’ and not as a frail old lady.

She died in her Husband’s arms.

She lived her life right up to the end, recording a ‘Loose Woman’ tribute a few days ago, which will be broadcast on wednesday on ITV.

fifthx:

The Doctor and the Black Guardian have a friendly little chat. From the second installment of the Key 2 Time trilogy, "The Destroyer of Delights".

donotlookatthedogpark:

Do you know how a TARDIS works? Do you want to? Then read this.
We all know about the four dimensions - length, width, height, and time. What most people don’t know about is the other thirteen. Yes, you heard me right. String theory is one of the more popular ideas in theoretical physics right now, but the hitch is that it doesn’t work mathematically unless you posit that there are seventeen dimensions.
Now, we’re not really sure what these dimensions do, but we do have these pictures of Calabi Yau manifolds that portray what seventeen dimensions should look like mathematically.
If you walk down the street in a straight line, you’re not walking down it in a straight line - the line is curved along the surface of the Earth at an imperceptible level due to subjectivity. Imagine if what we perceive as four dimensional is really seventeen dimensional. Everything is curved, twisted at sharp angles, interconnected - like a big ball of wibbly wobbly timey wimey stuff. That line that you see as straight could actually be parabolic or hyperbolic and you just can’t tell. And as such, the shortest distance between the two points is not the straight line you imagine you’re walking, but to translate yourself through one of the thirteen other dimensions.
This is how a TARDIS theoretically works - not only in travel, but in containing within itself a much larger inside. A strand of DNA is approximately 3 meters long and can be contained within a human cell, whose size varies but usually has a volume of approximately 2000 um, or 0.002 meters. While not exactly how this works, it’s a good analog for imagining how it does - the twists and turns of seventeen dimensional spacetime allow for a large four dimensional object to fit inside a much smaller one.
This is why it is called a Time and Relative Dimensions in Space.
Strange, how a show about time travel that’s fifty years old accidentally predicted modern physics… Must be a coincidence.

donotlookatthedogpark:

Do you know how a TARDIS works? Do you want to? Then read this.

We all know about the four dimensions - length, width, height, and time. What most people don’t know about is the other thirteen. Yes, you heard me right. String theory is one of the more popular ideas in theoretical physics right now, but the hitch is that it doesn’t work mathematically unless you posit that there are seventeen dimensions.

Now, we’re not really sure what these dimensions do, but we do have these pictures of Calabi Yau manifolds that portray what seventeen dimensions should look like mathematically.

If you walk down the street in a straight line, you’re not walking down it in a straight line - the line is curved along the surface of the Earth at an imperceptible level due to subjectivity. Imagine if what we perceive as four dimensional is really seventeen dimensional. Everything is curved, twisted at sharp angles, interconnected - like a big ball of wibbly wobbly timey wimey stuff. That line that you see as straight could actually be parabolic or hyperbolic and you just can’t tell. And as such, the shortest distance between the two points is not the straight line you imagine you’re walking, but to translate yourself through one of the thirteen other dimensions.

This is how a TARDIS theoretically works - not only in travel, but in containing within itself a much larger inside. A strand of DNA is approximately 3 meters long and can be contained within a human cell, whose size varies but usually has a volume of approximately 2000 um, or 0.002 meters. While not exactly how this works, it’s a good analog for imagining how it does - the twists and turns of seventeen dimensional spacetime allow for a large four dimensional object to fit inside a much smaller one.

This is why it is called a Time and Relative Dimensions in Space.

Strange, how a show about time travel that’s fifty years old accidentally predicted modern physics… Must be a coincidence.

iblamethenubbins:

A faithful representation of 7 seasons of the show.

jellybabiesandfishcustard:

quite obviously the best reaction to the TARDIS ever

I’m pretty sure Chang Lee is the first Companion to do this on screen. I know Rose and all the rest have done it since. But he was the first one to walk in, go NOPE, and then walk out and check his grasp on size and reality.

The Doctor and his hands [3/4]
Doctor Who 8.08 “Mummy on the Orient Express”

cleowho:

"So where are we going?"

The Armageddon Factor - season 16 - 1979

"If you’re funny, if there’s something that makes you laugh, then every day’s going to be okay."

I still believe in heroes.